Archive for the ‘Word’ Category

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Word: Find duplicated words

December 6, 2017

This find/replace is based on Paul Beverley’s work, so full acknowledgement to him for teaching me how to do this via his YouTube videos and his free book.

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Some of my authors inadvertently type the same word twice (e.g. is is, the the), and it’s often hard to pick these up when editing. If you run spellcheck, you may find them, but there’s no guarantee of that. The find and replace below uses wildcards to find any instance of duplicated words, followed by a space or a common punctuation mark, and then replaces that with a single word and the trailing space or punctuation.

NOTE: This find/replace only finds words with the exact same case, so it will find ‘the the’, ‘THE THE’, and ‘The The’, but it won’t find instances where each word has the same letters but with different cases (e.g. ‘the The’, ‘The the’, ‘tHe thE’ etc.)

Steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+H to open the Find and Replace dialog box.
  2. Click More, then select the Use wildcards option.
  3. In the Find field, type: (<[A-Za-z]@)[ ,.;:]@\1>
    (Note: There’s a space in there, so I suggest you copy this Find string.)
  4. In the Replace field, type: \1
  5. Click Find Next then click Replace. Repeat.

 

How this works — at least how I *think* it works:

  • Find: Look for the start of any word (<) made up of any number (@) of letters ([A-Za-z]) followed by a space or punctuation ([ ,.;:]) then repeat that find (@\1) until you can’t any more words that match the pattern (>).
  • Replace: Replace the first element (the first of the duplicate words) with itself (that’s the \1 bit), which effectively deletes the rest.

[Links last checked December 2017]

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Word: Find a year followed by a comma and replace with a semicolon

November 22, 2017

Another early morning question posed on Facebook…

The person was trying to use Word’s wildcard find and replace to convert all strings of Authorname nnnn, Authorname nnnn, Authorname nnnn, Authorname nnnn (i.e. any author’s name, followed by a 4-digit number for a year, such as Smith 2005, Jones 1997, etc., followed by a comma, followed by another author’s name etc.). He wanted to convert all the comma separators to semicolons, ending up with Authorname nnnn; Authorname nnnn; Authorname nnnn; Authorname nnnn. (I’ve italicised the text for clarity — it wasn’t in his original.)

Wildcard find/replace is all about finding the pattern and then figuring out how best to interpret that pattern in a meaningful way in how you search for what you want, and how you replace it with what you want.

In this example, an author name always ends in a lower case letter, is followed by a space, then four numbers for the year, a comma, a space, then an upper case letter for the next author’s name. The last item in the list doesn’t quite match the pattern (no comma, space, upper case letter following it),  but that one doesn’t need to change so we can ignore that variation to the pattern. He wanted to keep everything except the comma, which he wanted to change to a semicolon.

Here’s how I solved it using Word’s wildcard find and replace  (there may be a more elegant solution, but this one worked for me):

  • Find: ([0-9]{4})(,)( )([A-Z]) 
  • Replace: \1;\3\4

If you need to use this, I suggest you copy it as there’s a space in the third set of parentheses that you can’t see.

How this works:

  • Find: Look for any number from 0 to 9 [0-9] that has 4 digits {4} — this is the first element and is surrounded by parentheses. Then look for a comma (another element, so also surrounded by parens). Next look for a space (wow, more parens), and finally look for any upper case letter [A-Z] and as it’s a unique element, surround it by parens too.
  • Replace: Replace the first element (the 4-digit number) with itself (that’s the \1 bit), then a semicolon, then replace the third and fourth elements of the find with themselves (e.g. \3\4).

You keep everything you don’t want to change (elements 1, 3, and 4) and only change the second element by typing a semicolon in between elements 1 and 3.

 

 

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Word: Wildcard replace with a backslash

November 22, 2017

This morning, well before I was properly awake, I solved a problem someone had posed on a Facebook group I’m in. They had an issue getting Word’s wildcard find and replace to do what they wanted and had asked members of the group to help. I’m writing this up for my own future reference as there’s some information in here about the peculiarities of the backslash character that I may need to use again in the future. [Random fact: The backslash character is known by several names, including the reverse virgule and the reverse solidus.]

The person was trying to find an easy way to find all instances of 3x and replace with 3\x\. Actually, she was trying to do more than that — if she’d only been looking for that, then a normal find/replace should work. For the rest of the string, however, she really needed to use wildcards. Where she was getting stuck was defining the Find correctly, and then the Replace.

Here’s my solution (using wildcards):

  • Find: (3)(x) 
  • Replace: \1^92\2^92

How this works:

  • First, look for 3 followed immediately by x. I separated them in the Find string with parentheses so that I could treat them as separate elements in the Replace string.
  • Next, for the replace, type \1 to replace the first element (the 3) with itself, then type ^92 to add a backslash character (you can’t type a \ as that won’t work), then \2 to replace the second element of the Find with itself (i.e. the x), then another ^92 for a final backslash character.

Two things to note:

  • The backslash is an escape character in a Find, so if you need to find one, you need to surround it with square brackets and ‘escape’ it — i.e. [\\] in a Find.
  • The backslash is a special character in Replace too as it designates the element you want to replace with itself. Instead, you have to use ^92 in place of a \.

 

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Word: Print Comments only

November 14, 2017

You can print comments and track changes with a document easily enough, but what if you JUST want to print the comments in a Word document?

It’s a bit fiddly, but it can be done. Here’s how:

  1. Open the Word document that has comments.
  2. Go to the Review tab.
  3. Click the drop-down arrow next to the Show markup button.
  4. Turn off everything except Comments. You can only turn them off one at a time, so you’ll have to do the previous step and this one several times to turn off all the options except Comments. When you’re finished, only Comments should have a check mark next to it.
  5. Go to File > Print.
  6. Under Settings, the default to Print all pages. You don’t want that, so click the drop-down next to those words.
  7. Select List of Markup. Note: The Print Markup option at the bottom of the list should be ticked; if it’s not, select it too.
  8. Choose your printer as you normally, then click Print.

If you want to print out just one reviewer’s comments, repeat the steps above. When you get to Step 4, follow those instructions and then select Specific people from the Show Markup list and choose the person or people whose comments you want to print. Once you’ve done that, continue on from Step 5 above.

NOTE: I couldn’t find how to print just the comments in a Word document converted to PDF. Adobe Acrobat doesn’t recognise Word’s comments as comments, only its own.

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Word: Switch the number and punctuation order

October 29, 2017

On another blog post, Peter asked for some help:

I have hundreds of superscript characters (not footnote markers) that have a space before them and punctuation (periods and commas only) after them. I’m trying to delete the space and move the punctuation in front of it.

You can do this using a find/replace with wildcards. However, the instructions below DON’T differentiate between numbers that are superscripted and numbers that aren’t, so it will switch those too. If you don’t have any instances of <space>single ordinary number<period or comma>, then you should be fine. I suggest you try this on a COPY of your document and make sure you get what you want and nothing more, before using it on your main document.

Steps:

  1. Press Ctrl+H to open the Find and Replace dialog box.
  2. Click More, then select the Use wildcards option.
  3. In the Find field, type: ( )([0-9])([.,])
    (Note: There’s a space between the first set of parentheses. Because you have hundreds of these, there’s a good chance that you won’t have just single digit numbers. For multi-digit numbers, type this instead: ( )([0-9]@)([.,])
  4. In the Replace field, type: \3\2
  5. Click Find Next then click Replace. Repeat.

(Note: Only click Replace All if you are certain that no other ordinary numbers will be affected.)

What you are doing here is looking for a space (item 1), followed by any single digit number (item 2), followed by either a period or a comma (item 3). Then you’re replacing that string with the period or comma (item 3) then the number (item 2).

 

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Word: Add padding to a character style

May 29, 2017

My client wanted the button text in the user manual I was writing to look similar to the buttons in the app. For this app, blue, green, and orange background colours were used for the buttons, with white text.

Easy enough to do — just set up three Word character styles, one for each colour, have different coloured shading for each, and bold white text for the font. Make it simple for both writing and future updating by assigning keyboard shortcuts for each style. Done.

But, while my client liked what I’d done, he was concerned that the first and last letter of the button text butted up against the edge of the coloured shading (see image below), and wanted to know if we could add some padding.

I was pretty sure I could do that to a character style using borders the same colour, but then I ran into an issue I’d never seen before. When I applied a border of any weight or colour, I lost the background shading for the text. In the example below, you can see that the area inside the blue border has white space inside it, not blue shading with white text as I expected.

No matter what I did, I couldn’t get it to work. I explained the situation to my client. Fortunately, he’s a programmer and knows a bug when he sees one :-) He did a little bit of experimenting and came up with the solution, which was to reapply the background shading to the character style AFTER adding the border.

It worked, and here’s the end result (it has a 1.5 pt border, just enough to add a bit of padding to both ends of the text, but not too much that the top and bottom padding adds too much gap between lines in a paragraph):

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Word: Copy AutoCorrect entries to another computer

May 3, 2017

Did you know you can copy your AutoCorrect entries from one computer to another? You might want to share yours with a work colleague, or you might have a new computer and not want to set them all up again.

Beware: Copying these files to another computer WILL overwrite the AutoCorrect files in the destination computer, so if you’re copying them to a colleague’s computer, make sure they have listed their own AutoCorrect entries first (see https://cybertext.wordpress.com/2017/05/03/word-list-keyboard-shortcuts-autotext-and-autocorrect-entries/).

Notes:

Your AutoCorrect entries apply to all programs in the Microsoft Office suite, and are stored in *.ACL files under your user profile on your computer. When you copy them, you’ll put them in the same place but under the other user’s profile on their computer.

  1. On your computer, go to: C:\Users\[your_user_name]\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Office.
  2. You’ll see a suite of ACL files listed. The MSO numbers in each file name indicate the language/locale; e.g. MSO0127.acl = Math, MSO1033.acl = English (US), MSO2057.acl = English, (UK), MSO3081.acl = English (Australia). (For a full list of locale numbers, see: http://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/221435/list-of-supported-locale-identifiers-in-word.) Hint: Look at the date last modified — the ACL files with the most recent dates are likely the ones your installation of Office uses.
  3. Copy the ACL files you need (or copy them all if you’re not sure and they’re going to a new computer).
  4. On the destination computer, go to: C:\Users\[user_name_of_other person]\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Office.
  5. Paste the copied files into this folder, saying yes to overwrite the existing files.

[Links last checked May 2017]