Archive for the ‘Software’ Category

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Word: Displaying a style in the Styles gallery on the Home tab

July 9, 2020

Scenario: Not all the heading styles you need are shown in the Styles gallery on the Home tab in Word for Windows. For example, you can see Heading 1, but not Heading 2. You want to add Heading 2 to this gallery. I’ll use this as my example in the instructions below—modify according to the style you want to add.

Styles gallery on the Home tab, which shows Heading 1 but not Heading 2

Styles gallery on the Home tab, which shows Heading 1 but not Heading 2

There are two main steps you need to do—make sure that Heading 2 is shown in the Styles pane, and then modify the settings for Heading 2 to show it in the gallery. (Yes, I know there are there ways to do this, but for someone unfamiliar with styles, this is the simplest step-by-step set of instructions that assume little to no knowledge of styles.)

1. Show the style in the Styles pane

  1. At the bottom far right corner of the Gallery group on the Home tab, there’s a tiny arrow. Click that arrow to open the Styles pane.
  2. At the bottom of the Styles pane, click the Manage Styles icon.
  3. Click the Recommend tab on the Manage Styles window.
  4. Change the Sort option to Alphabetical—this makes it easier to find the style name.
  5. Find and select the name of the style you want to display in the Styles pane. It is likely set to (Hide until used). In this example, select Heading 2 (Hide Until Used).
  6. Click Show.
  7. Don’t close the Manage Styles window yet as you’ll do more things on it to modify the style.

2. Modify the settings for the style to show it in the Styles gallery

  1. On the Manage Styles window, click the Edit tab.
  2. Find and select the style you want to show in the Styles gallery (in this example, Heading 2).
  3. Click Modify.
  4. On the Modify Style window, select the Add to the Styles gallery checkbox.
  5. Click OK to close the Modify Style window.
  6. Click OK again to close the Manage Styles window.
  7. Your style should now be visible in the Styles gallery on the Home tab.

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Word: Document goes to ‘read-only’ for no reason

July 3, 2020

Note (3 July 2020): This is an updated version for Word 365 (for Windows) of the original post for Word 2007 (https://cybertext.wordpress.com/2010/07/14/word-2007-document-goes-to-read-only-for-no-reason/).

I’m not sure how widespread this problem is, but I’ve seen it a few times, and one of my work colleagues gets it regularly:

  • You’re happily working in a Word document, saving as you go, when all of a sudden you can’t save as you get a message that the document is set to ‘read-only’
  • You save and close a Word document, re-open it, work on it, try to save it again but get the ‘read-only’ message.

The workaround I’ve used to date has been to do a ‘save as’ and save the document with a slightly different file name.

However, after my colleague said that she’s getting the message all the time on a specific document, it was time for me to go off to Google and check if anyone else gets this and how they solved it.

Here are some possible solutions I found:

  • Turn off Allow Background Saves. There may be a conflict with when you do a manual save and the automatic save (File > Options > Advanced > Save subsection).
  • Turn off AutoRecover (File > Options > Save > Save AutoRecover information every xx minutes).
  • Open the Save As window (quickest — press F12 to open the Save As window, OR File > Save As > More options (link), Once you’re on the Save As window, click the Tools drop-down (to the immediate left of the Save button) > General Options > the clear the Read-only Recommended check box if it’s checked.
  • Reboot your computer and immediately check your Temp and Templates folders for lurking temporary files not deleted properly (don’t open any Office applications until after you’ve done this—your Temp folder should be empty after a fresh reboot). Your Temp folder is located here: C:\Users\<UserName>\AppData\Local\Temp. Also check in C:\Users\<UserName>\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Templates to make sure that there are no temp files there too. Temp files are easy to spot—they have a tilde (~) in front of the file name and have a tmp file extension.
  • Try saving to your Documents folder (if you normally save to a network location or some other folder) to see if this makes any difference.
  • Make sure the document you have open is not sitting inside a Zip file.
  • Check Windows Explorer and make sure you don’t have the document open in Preview pane view as this will lock it (in Windows 10, open Windows Explorer and go to View > Panes group > Preview pane).
  • Make sure the document you are trying to save is not an Outlook attachment that’s still open in Outlook.
  • Set your anti-virus (AV) software to not scan Word 365 files. Personally, I’d try this one as a last resort; also, in some corporate environments, you may not be able to change your AV settings.

[Link last checked July 2020]

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Word: Find and replace a word or phrase within a header or footer

June 9, 2020

This post is similar to the one I wrote for finding/replace a word/phrase within comments.

NOTE: It only works if you have some text in any header or footer in the document—if the headers/footers haven’t been used, then you do not get the option to find the text within them.

  1. Press Ctrl+h to open the Find and Replace window. It will open with Replace as the active tab.
  2. Select the Find tab. This is important as this is the only place you can specify to search only in the comments.
  3. Type the word/phrase you want to find in the Find field.
  4. Still on the Find tab, click Find In.
  5. Select Headers and Footers.
    On the Find tab of the Find and Replace window, type the word or phrase to find in the comments, then click Find In, followed by Comments
  6. Now go to the Replace tab. The word/phrase you typed in the Find tab is carried over to the Replace tab, AND the ‘find in headers and footers’ setting is carried over too, even though there’s nothing to tell you that.
  7. Do the find/replace as you normally would—if you think you might accidentally replace something you shouldn’t, then do Find Next followed by Replace as necessary; if you’re confident that you’ll only replace what you need to (e.g. a company name), then go ahead and click Replace All. Only the word/phrase in the comments is replaced, not anywhere else in the document.

 

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Word: Find and replace a word or phrase within comments

June 9, 2020

Tracy contacted me to ask if there was a way to find/replace a word (e.g. a company name) used within comments.

There are a couple of ways you can do this—one is to save the document as a ZIP file and modify the comments.xml file (see the steps in blog post for something similar: https://cybertext.wordpress.com/2013/04/10/word-removing-reviewer-names/), but the other way is much simpler and is what I describe here.

  1. Press Ctrl+h to open the Find and Replace window. It will open with Replace as the active tab.
  2. Select the Find tab. This is important as this is the only place you can specify to search only in the comments.
  3. Type the word/phrase you want to find in the Find field.
  4. Still on the Find tab, click Find In.
  5. Select Comments.
    On the Find tab of the Find and Replace window, type the word or phrase to find in the comments, then click Find In, followed by Comments
  6. Now go to the Replace tab. The word/phrase you typed in the Find tab is carried over to the Replace tab, AND the ‘find in comments’ setting is carried over too, even though there’s nothing to tell you that.
  7. Do the find/replace as you normally would—if you think you might accidentally replace something you shouldn’t, then do Find Next followed by Replace as necessary; if you’re confident that you’ll only replace what you need to (e.g. a company name), then go ahead and click Replace All. Only the word/phrase in the comments is replaced, not anywhere else in the document.

NOTE: This also works for words in headers and footers. See https://cybertext.wordpress.com/2020/06/09/word-find-and-replace-a-word-or-phrase-within-a-header-or-footer/

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Word: Lost your document?

May 23, 2020

I nearly ‘lost’ the 320p Word document I was working on today. And I saw how, in case this helps someone else.

I don’t save to One Drive and don’t have Auto Save turned on, let alone Auto Save to OneDrive. I was typing a comment and must have hit some weird key combination (I was typing ‘et al. 2018’, so nothing there that might have triggered it as far as I know). All of a sudden I get a box come up that tells me Word is preparing to autosave to One Drive. Hmmm… it does it’s thing and I then immediately did Ctrl+s to save my doc, but then I thought I’d better check where it was saving to.

So I did File > Save As, only to find that my save location wasn’t my local drive, but was now OneDrive!

Had I not checked, I could’ve been saving to OneDrive for the rest of the day, and not known, then freaked out when I came back in tomorrow to work on it to find it the latest version in my local drive was from a day earlier, not from when I’d last saved.

Bottom line: If Word saves to OneDrive without you being aware, any future saves of that document are also to OneDrive, not your local drive until you change it back.

I can see why this would be a default strategy, but it could cause all sorts of anxiety if you didn’t know it had happened. So for those who ‘lose’ documents and only save locally, check your OneDrive account for them.

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Word: Find and highlight hyperlinks

May 6, 2020

Someone on one of my Facebook groups for editors wanted to highlight all instances of linked words, URLs, etc. copied from another document so she could alert the author to them. These links weren’t styled with the Hyperlink style and had no colour to distinguish them from normal text.

There are a few steps to get this right, including changing a setting. Instructions are for Word 365 for Windows, but should work the same for older versions of Word, and possibly Mac versions as well, but I can’t test Word for Mac as I don’t have it. This technique works for any hyperlinked text—URLs, email addresses, linked documents etc.

  1. Press Alt+F9 to turn the ‘show field codes’ option on in the entire document. This is essential. (You can also do this by going to File> Options > Advanced > Show Document Content section, checking the Show field codes instead of their values checkbox, then clicking OK to close the Options window.)
  2. Select a highlight colour from the Home tab > Font group. This is also essential.
  3. Open the Find and Replace window (Ctrl+h).
  4. In the Find field, type ^d hyperlink (Note: lower case ‘d’; this looks for a hyperlink field [^d]).
  5. In the Replace field, type ^& (this replaces what is found with itself).
  6. Click More.
  7. Click Format.
  8. Select Highlight.
  9. Click Find Next, then Replace on the first one found. Check that the hyperlink field code is highlighted—if it isn’t go back to Step 4 and choose a highlight colour.
  10. If you’re satisfied that it works, click Replace All. This will highlight all hyperlink fields.
  11. Press Alt+F9 again to hide the field codes and return to normal text display. (tThis is the same as File> Options > Advanced > Show Document Content section, uncheck the Show field codes instead of their values checkbox, then click OK to close the Options window.)
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Word: Select a vertical section

March 31, 2020

Here’s a summary of the problem posted on an editors’ Facebook group I belong to: “I’ve been sent a Word doc that has been [converted] from a PDF. As it’s a doc in the editing stages for an academic journal, it still has the line numbers in the left margin. However, when it was [converted] to Word, these numbers are now part of each line individually (and some of them are images rather than text), meaning I can’t highlight them in one swoop and delete them. The idea of having to individually delete 50 numbers [from each of] 38 pages seems *very* untenable.”

Somewhere in the deep recesses of my mind, I recall once knowing how to do this—how to select a vertical section in Word and then styling it separately or deleting it. I hunted these blog posts (which are my memory dump), but couldn’t find anything. So I did some testing and found the solution, which is:

  1. Hold down the Alt key.
  2. Use the mouse to click and drag over the section of text you want to delete or restyle.
  3. Once selected, either press Del to delete it, or do something else to restyle it (e.g. make it bold, italics).

And that’s it. Here are a couple of screen shots to show you what this sort of selection looks like—note that you can select ANY part of the text.

Example showing just the first letter of each line selected

Example showing just the first letter of each line selected

Example showing the middle vertical section of a set of paragraphs selected

Example showing the middle vertical section of a set of paragraphs selected

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Word: Ctrl + arrow keys not working as expected

March 24, 2020

Here’s a strange one in Word—all of a sudden I couldn’t use a Ctrl+arrow key to jump from word to word.

I thought about closing Word then trying again, which likely would’ve worked. Then I heard a very faint sound coming from my headphones on the desk next me. Word was reading aloud to me and so was jumping from word to word without me realising it! I must’ve hit some keyboard combination to start it (yes, Alt+Ctrl+Space—I’d been using Ctrl+Space and must’ve accidentally hit Alt as well).

Once I found out where to turn the Read Aloud function off (Review tab), I had full control of my keyboard again.

Hope this helps someone else.

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Snagit: Quick way to get text from a PDF etc.

March 5, 2020

I’ve used TechSmith’s Snagit for years for screen captures and for quick image editing, but wasn’t aware of the OCR function that it has to grab the text from PDFs, images etc.

Details are here: https://www.techsmith.com/blog/extract-text-from-image/

I just tested it on a fairly complex bit of text arranged in columns, and while it wasn’t perfect, it worked remarkably well. It was certainly better than other methods I’d tried on this particular test PDF.

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Word: Add a web link to a document — quickly

February 26, 2020

In the category of “I didn’t know I could do this (or if I did, I’ve forgotten!)” comes this tip that I spotted in a forum post (https://superuser.com/questions/1024583/copy-link-location-keyboard-shortcut-in-windows-10).

Did you know that you can drag a link displayed in a browser into your Word document? Or into other text editing software? (my quick tests indicate that it DOESN’T work with Notepad)

There are several ways:

  • Click and drag the linked text into an open document. If the link is abbreviated or hidden by explanatory text (e.g. a link for ‘how to xxxx’), it will resolve to the full URL.
  • Select the URL in the browser’s address bar then drag it into the open document.
  • Select anything in a text field of a form on a web page, then drag it into the open document.

[Link last checked February 2020]