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Spellcheck is useless against real words with different meanings

February 1, 2019

An example of where spellcheck is useless, and where you need human eyes to check your work before it goes out. I received a letter today from an Australia-wide company that conducts hearing checks. At the bottom of the letter was this set of boxes. I spotted two major errors straight away that spellcheck wouldn’t pick up (and no, one of them wasn’t ‘tick’ — Australians use ‘tick’ more than ‘check’ when referring to boxes, though a ‘the’ wouldn’t have gone astray in that instruction).

The errors I picked up were ‘everyday’ instead of ‘every day’, and ‘know’ instead of ‘no’. Neither instance would have been flagged by spellcheck. The message here — get someone else to check your work before it goes out to a national audience!

2 comments

  1. Rhonda Back in the day (late 80s), my wife a librarian, me the wordsmith, in 36 point on a pen plotter. To the assembled multitude:

    Dear Pubic Librarians

    Not much has changes except a need to read. John

    On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 at 10:54, CyberText Newsletter wrote:

    > Rhonda posted: “An example of where spellcheck is useless, and where you > need human eyes to check your work before it goes out. I received a letter > today from an Australia-wide company that conducts hearing checks. At the > bottom of the letter was this set of boxes. I spo” >


  2. I have long said that editors’ jobs are Recession-proof, in the sense that they will almost always be needed. The remaining questions are not about need, but about whether people are willing to pay for the services and whether there are benefits associated with the gig. :)



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