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LavaCon2018: Day 2

October 24, 2018

Day 2 started as per Day 1, with several short (20 minute) plenary sessions.

A journey to intelligent content delivery

The first breakout session I attended was another case study on how a software company transformed their help and documentation offering using Zoomin, in this case Pam Goodwin describing how her small team of 6 authors changed how documentation was viewed for Cherwell, an IT service management company with 450 employees.

Before:

  • focus was on ‘catch up’ documentation
  • dated look
  • poor search capability
  • different help systems and tools used for different rpoducts
  • no consolidated search
  • no access outside the software to other information

Interim (2016):

  • used SuiteHelp
  • based on DITA source
  • improved searching
  • standalone systems for each product release
  • needed separate PDF plug-in and PDF delivery model

After (2018):

  • easy to find
  • cross-product and cross-version support
  • multi language support
  • improved searching
  • on-demand PDF creation by users at point of need
  • responsive design
  • scalable
  • simple delivery model for authors
  • easy maintenance

Why choose Zoomin Docs?

  • met all their requirements
  • powerful search
  • minimal changes to DITA source
  • improved analytics (esp. for searches)
  • on-demand PDFs
  • built-in feedback mechanism
  • past relationship with vendor’s personnel
  • great customer references

How they sold it to decision makers:

  • Timing — new leadership were looking for opportunities to modernise and scale
  • Executive support — Chief Product officer (CPO) saw tech docs as a valuable marketing tool, esp. once he realised that when he was researching a product, he always checked the docs as part of his decision making
  • Strong program management — saw value and helped navigate the approval process
  • Affordable solution — able to take great strides with minimal investment and compressed timeline

Project challenges:

  • lack of UI/UX support at kick-off
  • struggled with taxonomy shift; once made, then kept it simple
  • quickly pushed multi language support and context-sensitive help to phase [not sure what I wrote there!]
  • table formatting issues
  • automation issues
  • user management
  • need a third testing environment

Results:

  • significant increase in users (27%)
  • number of sessions per user down (i.e. ‘hit and run’)
  • 320% increase in number of page views
  • 91% increase in unique page views
  • 37% decrease in bounce rates
  • 17.5% increase in Net Promoter score [what is this?] in past year; great customer comments

Creating interactive intelligent style guides

(George Bina, Oxygen)

20 years since XML standard was first published, and since Oxygen was created.

A style guide is a set of rules to follow when writing content. (e.g. how to style code blocks so the code remains correct, but visually readable). A style guide helps you avoid making mistakes.

A style guide should:

  • evolve and grow over time
  • deal with errors/new issues as you find them

But often there are too many rules.

Solution: Automate. Auto detect when content doesn’t follow a specific rule. (e.g. Schematron will detect variations in patterns in structured docs; Acrolynx).

Schematron can also check text via regular expressions. Works inside the authoring tool (e.g. Oxygen XML Editor) and is integrated within it so you get messages about potential errors while writing.

With Schematron, you select the rule and provide your parameters, plus a message for the writer.

(Note: I left this session halfway through because while automated style guides are something I wanted to know more about, what he was demonstrating was the integration between an XML/DITA editor [which I don’t use] and Schematron — I couldn’t see how I would ever use this.)

End of day plenaries

The last two plenaries of the day were from David Dylan Thomas (The content strategy of civil discourse: Turning conflict into collaboration) and Megan Gilhooly (The power of learning you were wrong). Both were really excellent!

 

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