h1

LavaCon2018: Workshop day

October 22, 2018

I’m in New Orleans and it’s Sunday, which means it’s workshop day at the LavaCon conference! I attended Melinda Belcher’s Preparing Technical Content for Translation half-day workshop. There were about 15 people in the workshop and several were from other countries, so there were lots of perspectives and good information sharing. Some people were in the early stages of translation projects, others were well into it, and yet others were just trying to get information to tailor their documentation so that it was ready for translation sometime in the future.

Here are my notes from Melinda’s session.

Her focus was on optimising content for translation in terms of:

  • Clarity
  • Structure
  • Format
  • Localisation strategy.

Much of what she had to say was very similar to the principles of the plain language movement.

Clarity

  • Keep sentences brief
  • Use as few words as possible
  • Short words are better than long words
  • Use plain English to make your point
  • Use a single term to identify a single concept
  • Write so your audience can understand you
  • Test your word choice and sentence design

Structure

  • Avoid unnecessary complexity
  • Lighten the cognitive load through strategic delivery of information
  • Use Standard English word order whenever possible
  • Use the active voice rather than the passive
  • Use relative pronouns like ‘that’ and ‘which’
  • Avoid phrasal verbs (containing a verb form with one or more articles)
  • Avoid long noun strings

Format

  • Make sure it fits (e.g. German takes much more space than the English equivalent)
  • Be clear with international dates and measurements etc.
  • Allow extra space for translated words
  • Allow extra time for formatting text in languages that read from right to left
  • Make readers aware of other [language] versions

Localisation strategy

  • Avoid humour
  • Strengthen your organisation’s capacity for translation oversight (not just words – cultural nuances, context, fonts, non-Romanised languages, compound words, dialects, other influences)
  • Establish and implement written guidelines for translation methods and for assessing the qualifications of a translator/agency
  • Consider a transcreation process (not necessarily good for long text, but may work well for marketing material [e.g. taglines, slogans, apps])
  • Other approaches to translation: single one-way translation; multiple one-way translation; reverse translation (i.e. translation back into English)

Early on in the session, she made a comment about text embedded in images – get the words out of the images and put them into callouts, captions etc.

She also mentioned these tools:

One comment

  1. Great information!! I’m in the group gathering info to begin designing a translation process for our software and documentation. Thanks for posting this helps a great deal!



Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: