Archive for April, 2017

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Word: Unlock a password-protected document

April 18, 2017

I spotted this 2009 article (http://people.csail.mit.edu/teller/misc/unlockworddoc.html) a few weeks ago, and have now had time to test it — it works!

Now, why would you want to unlock a password-protected Word document? Surely the author/company has locked it for a reason? Yes, in many cases, that’s correct and you shouldn’t try to circumvent the password protection — instead, ask the author/company for the password if you need to access elements of the document (e.g. protected form fields, formatting tools etc.).

However, if the author has left the company, or if they wrote the document many years ago and have forgotten the password (it happens!), then you may need to break the password protection to access the document’s contents and functions.

You can follow the steps in the link above, or, in case the content at that link gets removed at any stage, follow my modified and more detailed steps below, which are based on that article:

  1. Open the password-protected document in Word.
  2. Go to File > Save As, then select Word XML Document (*.xml) from the Save as type drop-down list.
    Select Word XML Document from the Save as Type drop-down list
  3. Click Save.
  4. Close Word.
  5. Right-click on the saved XML file (it should be in the same folder as your original document), then select Open with and choose a text editing program to open the file with (e.g. WordPad, NotePad, or other text editing program — do NOT choose Microsoft Word).
  6. Press Ctrl+F to open the Find dialog box.
  7. In the Find what field, type enforcement.
  8. You’ll find one instance, either w:enforcement=”1″ or w:enforcement=”on”.
    Find 'enforcement'
  9. Replace the “1” with a zero “0” (or replace “on” with “off”) to disable enforcement. This step unlocks the document.
  10. Save the XML document within your text editor, then close the text editing software.
  11. Right-click on the saved XML file, then select Open with and choose Microsoft Word.
  12. As soon as you’ve opened it, go to File > Save As, then select Word Document (*.docx) from the Save as type drop-down list. Change the file name if you want to preserve the original password-protected document an make this a new document, or use the same file name to replace the original document.
  13. Click Save. You should now be able to edit the document.

[Link last checked April 2017]

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ACES Conference: 2017

April 13, 2017

I attended (and spoke at) the American Copy Editors Society (ACES) annual conference in St Petersburg, Florida in March. I loved the Tampa/St Pete area!

Just for my records, here are the sessions I attended, with a brief summary for each of them.

Thursday March 23

  • Quick fixes you may have forgotten about (Merrill Perlman): A nice refresher of things that you can overlook when editing. Merrill is a funny, engaging speaker.
  • Catch as catch can (John Russial): Math!! Especially the difference between percentage and percentage point increases/decreases. Valuable.
  • Professional Etiquette: Navigate networking without making enemies (Christina Frey, Sarah Grey, Barbie Halaby, Heather Saunders): Very professionally presented, with seamless segues between members of the panel. Lots of content and great ideas.
  • ‘Word by Word: The secret life of dictionaries’ (Kory Stamper): Kory’s book had just been published a few days before the conference and this was her first-ever reading from it. She read an excerpt from the first chapter. It was so good, I ordered a copy online immediately afterwards (it was a hardback and only 24 copies were available at the conference) — my ordered copy beat me home. I’m about halfway through it and thoroughly savouring every word. Highly recommended for word nerds!

Friday, March 24

  • The Online Misinformation Ecosystem (general session) (Craig Silverman): Craig works for Buzzfeed. This session was great on pointing out how news and social media can manipulate a story.
  • Computer-Assisted Copy Editing: Using Tansa’s Products for Clear, Concise and Consistent Content (Chris Grimm): Excellent overview of some online tools available for checking consistency. However, each requires a link back to an online server, and so wouldn’t be acceptable to my main client.
  • The Editor as Writer: Essential Tools and Strategies (With Music!) (Roy Peter Clark): Great session, covering many basic (but often forgotten) strategies.
  • Faking Extroversion as an Introvert (Samantha Enslen, Rachel Godward, Laura Lattimer): Good session, but unfortunately Sam only ended up with about 3 minutes to cover all she had to say, which was a shame as she’s an excellent speaker.
  • ‘French toast’ vs. ‘french fries’: The Wild West of Food Editing (Wendy Allen, Janet Keeler): I loved this session! I don’t do food editing, but I cook, eat, and dine out, and read cookbooks and menus. I’m sure that qualifies, right? Oh, I was the only one in the room who knew the difference between grazer (an animal that grazes on grass) and grazier (a person who looks after such animals) — obviously ‘grazier’, which is well known in Australia, is little known in the US.
  • Banquet – keynote speaker Anne Curzan: Introduced us to ‘grammando!’, and recommended we use it instead of ‘grammar nazi’

Saturday, March 25

  • The Art of the Possible: The Dictionary as Authority of a Changing Language (Kory Stamper, Peter Sokolovksi, Anne Curzan): Lexicographers and linguists — these are my people and they are ‘on fleek’! :-)
  • Save Time and Your Sanity: Increase your Efficiency with Microsoft Word (me!): The room held about 70 seats — all were full, and about another 30 people were on the floor or leaning on the walls, which is tough for 90 minutes! Thanks for coming — and for staying, if you were one of the floor people.
  • Government Contract Editing–Guidelines to Make It Work (Elizabeth LaPlante, Helen O’Guinn): Good advice on plain language when writing and responding to RFPs etc.
  • How to Diagram Sentences — and Why (Lisa McLendon): A whirlwind trip through sentence diagramming, with examples for us to try. This wasn’t taught in Australian schools when I was growing up, so was unfamiliar to me, but I like the structure of it.
  • Lightning Presentations and Closing General Session: More whirlwind presentations. Kudos to the presenters!!