Archive for July, 2016

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Word: Find expanded text or spaces

July 26, 2016

Problem

Today I edited an activity guide. It had a formatting oddness that took me a while to figure out. Every so often (not consistently, but at least once or twice per paragraph), there would be a single space that looked like a double space.

It took me forever to figure out what the problem was (Expanded font style), then research how to fix it. I couldn’t find anything that indicated that I could do a global search & replace. If anyone knows a way to search & replace on particular formatting on Word, I’d love to know.

Solution

In Word for Windows, you can search for expanded text and replace it with normal, BUT you need to know how much it’s expanded by, and hope that all is expanded to the same degree.

In the screenshot below, some spaces (highlighted in green) are expanded by 2 pt. All others are not expanded. The yellow highlight shows an instance of a normal space followed by a ‘Y’ so you can see the difference between that and the green one with the expanded space in front of another ‘Y’. These things are hard to see, so make sure your formatting marks are turned on and zoom in — I zoomed in to 150% in this example.

FR_expanded space01

  1. Select one of the expanded spaces and check the Font settings > Advanced tab to find out what degree of expansion is used (e.g. 1 pt, 1.1 pt, 2 pt etc.). Write it down.
  2. Go to the Find and Replace dialog box (Ctrl+H), then the Replace tab.
  3. Type the space into the Find what field.
  4. Click More.
    FR_expanded space02
  5. Click Format > Font.
    FR_expanded space03
  6. Click the Advanced tab and select Expanded from the Spacing options, then enter the point size you found out earlier into the By field.
    FR_expanded space04
  7. Click OK to return to the Replace tab — you should have ‘Expanded by xx pt’ below the Find what field.
    FR_expanded space05
  8. Go to the Replace with field, type a space, then More > Format > Font > Advanced tab, select Spacing = Normal.
    FR_expanded space06
  9. Click OK to return to the Replace tab. The Replace with field should have ‘Not Expanded by /Condensed by’ below it.
    FR_expanded space07
  10. Click Find Next and then Replace to find each expanded space and replace it with a normal space (if you’re confident, click Replace All).

 

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Black screen on computer bootup

July 24, 2016

My computer wouldn’t boot up this morning. The lights were on, but the screens were black. I’d seen the manufacturer’s logo, but then nothing. No Windows login screen. Nada.

I tried a second reboot — same result. Then a third. No joy.

And then I saw that I still had my fancy Parrot Zik bluetooth headphones plugged in to a USB port to charge. Hmmmm…. Every time I’ve plugged them in, I get a message about a new device and do I want to open files, etc., so the computer thinks they are an external device. My husband has an external drive that won’t allow his computer to start up if it’s plugged in on bootup, so perhaps the headphones were the reason?

I unplugged the headphones, rebooted the computer, and everything booted up as it should. The headphones were the culprit!

Interestingly, I have an external hard drive that’s always plugged into this PC, but it’s ignored on bootup. I probably need to talk to my PC Guru guys to see if I can alter the startup sequence to look for the hard drive first, instead of any external drives.

Update 25 July 2016: I checked the BIOS boot sequence the next morning, and found that my hard drive is listed second, in front of USB storage devices, CD/DVD, onboard NIC, and the external HDD (last). However, ‘Diskette Drive’ is listed first (who’s used a floppy drive in the past 10 years???), so I’m pretty sure the PC thought the plugged in USB headphones were a floppy disk! Also, a quick Google search of “usb headphones boot sequence”gives many articles from others who have had this problem with various headsets/headphones.