Starting a sentence with a conjunction

October 1, 2015

Based on a Writing Tip I wrote for my work colleagues.


One of the authors asked me about starting a sentence with Because:

I was curious about a change you made. The original paragraph started with “As the trunkline fluids….” and you changed it to “Because the trunkline fluids……”

As Because the trunkline fluids will spread and weather rapidly due to wind and weather, containing/booming the fluids to the required thickness to start and maintain a controlled burn is not…

I was under the impression that you shouldn’t begin a sentence with “Because.”

Can you shed any light on this for me?

Great question!

You can start a sentence with a conjunction – and, but, because etc. Typically, that ‘rule’ about not starting with a conjunction is a hangover from early school days and teachers who had it inculcated into them in their school days, possibly back to when Latin was the lingua franca.

I changed it to because because as has so many possible meanings (24, according to [Australian] Macquarie Dictionary). Because only has four meanings in Macquarie, two of which are colloquial and irrelevant to the context, and the other two are basically the same – ‘for the reason that’.

As far as business report writing goes, starting a sentence with And or But may be too casual. However, in our reports we start sentences with However (a good substitute for But), Although, While, Since, Therefore, etc. all the time – I put Because in the same category. I always check sentences starting with As, because that word has so many possible meanings, and will substitute something more appropriate to the context if necessary.

The Australian Style Manual (which, along with Macquarie, is one of our authorities) says this (p72-73):

‘Because’ and other subordinators to start a sentence

The idea that words like because, although, since and while cannot be used at the start of a sentence seems to arise out of a mistaken assumption that, because conjunctions join phrases or clauses together, they must have words on either side of them. This does not happen at the start of a sentence, hence this odd prescription. The reality is that a subordinating conjunction goes with the subordinate clause, wherever it is placed:

We notified the secretary because he is the person responsible.

Because he is responsible, we notified the secretary.

These perfectly grammatical sentences show the subordinating conjunction at two different points in the sentence, prefacing the explanatory clause (‘he is the person responsible’). Explanatory and other subordinate clauses (such as those with if and when) can certainly be used at the front of a sentence, and the conjunction will then be the first word.

Other discussions on this:


[Links last checked October 2015]

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