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Word: Jump to next Track Change with keyboard

June 2, 2010

If you use Word’s Track Changes, you’re probably familiar with the Review tab (Word 2007) or the Reviewing toolbar (Word 2003), and the buttons to skip to the next change to review it.

Word 2007: Changes group on the Review tab, showing Next and Previous buttons

Word 2003: Next (and Previous) buttons on the Reviewing toolbar

The problem is, sometimes you need to make other edits in between accepting or rejecting changes, or need to add further comments. Moving your mouse back up to that Next button becomes tedious very quickly.

What you need is a keyboard shortcut for skipping to the next change. There isn’t one set by default in Word, so you need to create your own.

Here’s how…

Word 2007

  1. Click the small drop-down arrow at the very right of your Quick Access Toolbar (QAT).
  2. Select More Commands.
  3. Click the Customize button.
  4. On the Customize Keyboard window, select the Review Tab from the Categories list (1 in the screen shot below), then select NextChangeOrComment from the Commands list (2).
  5. Put your cursor in the Press new shortcut key field, then press the key combination you want to use for this action (3). (In the example above, I pressed Alt and c — you can press whatever key combination you think you will remember easily. Just make sure that it’s not currently assigned to another action by checking the Currently assigned to information below the Current keys box).
  6. Click Assign (4), then click Close (5).

You’re now ready to use this keyboard shortcut for skipping to the next Track Change in your document.

Word 2003

  1. Go to Tools > Customize on the menu.
  2. Select the Commands tab.
  3. Click the Keyboard button (bottom of the dialog box).
  4. Select All Commands from the Categories list (1 in the screen shot below).
  5. Select NextChangeOrComment from the Commands list (2).
  6. Put your cursor in the Press new shortcut key field, then press the key combination you want to use for this action (3). (In the example above, I pressed Alt and c — you can press whatever key combination you think you will remember easily. Just make sure that it’s not currently assigned to another action by checking the Currently assigned to information below the Current keys box).
  7. Click Assign (4), then click Close (5).

You’re now ready to use this keyboard shortcut for skipping to the next Track Change in your document.

10 comments

  1. Useful. I used Alt-Shift-O / Alt-Shift-P for previous / next change.

    Will have a look at the other shortcuts later.


  2. Thanks, this was a really clear and useful reminder.


  3. Thanks much for posting this.


  4. Very useful. Thanks.


  5. This is a shining example of how to do tutorials properly. Took only a quick moment to go through the instructions and implement; didn’t even have to read the texts. Thanks a lot for this!


  6. Thanks Lauri! Looks like I chose the right career as a technical writer ;-)


  7. “Moving your mouse back up to that Next button becomes tedious very quickly.”

    This is one of the reasons why I prefer touchscreens. Windows 8 may not have done much good but promoting touchscreens and making them cheaper through economies of scale is a positive outcome.


  8. […] you’re using other versions of Word, see this article for specific instructions for assigning a shortcut key to functions in ribbons and […]


  9. Wonderful to find this tip about assigning keyboard shortcuts. I have tried to create a macro for the “Go to next change” since Word 2013, but that very function would not stick into a macro. No my life is worth living again!



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