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Word: Multilevel Appendix headings

January 31, 2012

One of the challenges I got the other day was to add second and third levels to the existing Level 1 Appendix headings in the client’s template.

After some trial and error, I got it to work. These instructions are for Word 2007, but they should work similarly in Word 2010.

This is not a simple procedure and requires you to follow the steps exactly, so turn off all other distractions (Twitter, Facebook, emails) otherwise you might miss a step and that could well make it not work.

What my client wanted:

Appendix 1
Appendix 1.1
Appendix 1.1.1

Appendix 2
Appendix 2.1
Appendix 2.2
Appendix 2.2.1
Appendix 2.2.2 etc.

In other words, outline numbering similar to that we use in the main body of the template, but with the word ‘Appendix’ prefacing the numbering. Naturally, this was to be a separate numbering sequence to that used for Headings 1 to 5. They also wanted the three levels of Appendix numbering to display in the Table of Contents (TOC).

There are four broad steps in this procedure:

  1. Set up the Appendix heading styles.
  2. Set up the Appendix List style and the numbering settings for each of the levels.
  3. Test by applying the Appendix heading styles to some text.
  4. Optional: Modify the TOC to display the Appendix heading levels.

You can set this up for a single document, or, better, set it up in your template.

Step 1: Set up the Appendix heading styles

The following steps assume you already know how to create a new style in Word:

  1. Create three new styles for the Appendix headings (I called mine Appendix H1, Appendix H2, and Appendix H3).
  2. Apply some basic formatting to these styles — font family, font size, bold, paragraph alignment, left indentation (I used 0 cm), hanging indent (I used 3.5 cm to allow for the length of the word ‘Appendix’), tab (I set the left tab position to 3.5 cm).
  3. Set the following paragraph to the body text style you usually use.

Step 2: Set up the Appendix List style and the numbering settings for each of the levels

Now, here’s where you have to really concentrate and follow the instructions exactly as it’s here where it can all go pear-shaped:

  1. On the Home tab, go to the Paragraph group.
  2. Click the tiny drop-down arrow to the immediate right of the Multilevel List icon.
  3. Select Define New List Style.
  4. On the Define New List Style dialog box, enter a name for this list style set — I’ve called mine Appendix Headings.
  5. Notice that the default level is 1st level. Leave it at that, and set the formatting for the number (i.e. the Appendix x bit of the final heading). I used the same formatting as that for the Appendix H1 style. NOTE: This formatting ONLY applies to the number part of the heading, NOT the heading itself. Don’t set the numbering on this dialog box — you’ll do that in a minute.
  6. Click Format at the lower left of this dialog box, then select Numbering.
  7. On the Modify Multilevel List dialog box, click More before doing anything else. This shows all the available settings.


  8. Select 1 as the level to modify (it’s probably already selected).
  9. Link the level to the Appendix H1 style.
  10. Select the 1, 2, 3 number style.
  11. Type the word Appendix in front of the number in the long Number Format field and delete the closing parenthesis after the number in that field.
  12. Set the indentations and tab positions (I set the alignment at 0 cm, and the indentation and tab stops at 3.5 cm, following my Appendix H1 style’s settings). Don’t set any other settings.
  13. Click OK to return to the Define New List Style dialog box.
  14. On the Define New List Style dialog box, select 2nd level then select your formatting options for this level of numbering.
  15. Click Format at the lower left of this dialog box, then select Numbering to open the Modify Multilevel List dialog box.
  16. Select 2 as the level to modify.
  17. Link the level to the Appendix H2 style.
  18. Select the 1, 2, 3 number style.
  19. Type the word Appendix in front of the number in the long Number Format field and delete any punctuation after the number in that field.
  20. THIS BIT IS IMPORTANT: Put your cursor IN FRONT of the number in the Number Format field and type a period. Move your cursor IN FRONT of the period you just typed, then click the drop-down arrow for Include level number from and select Level 1. You should end up with Appendix 1.1 in the Number format field.
  21. Set the indentations and tab positions (I set the alignment at 0 cm, and the indentation and tab stops at 3.5 cm, following my Appendix H1 and H2 style’s settings). Don’t set any other settings.
  22. Click OK to return to the Define New List Style dialog box.
  23. On the Define New List Style dialog box, select 3rd level then select your formatting options for this level of numbering.
  24. Click Format at the lower left of this dialog box, then select Numbering to open the Modify Multilevel List dialog box.
  25. Select 3 as the level to modify.
  26. Link the level to the Appendix H3 style.
  27. Select the 1, 2, 3 number style.
  28. Type the word Appendix in front of the number in the long Number Format field and delete any punctuation after the number in that field.
  29. THIS BIT IS IMPORTANT: Put your cursor IN FRONT of the number in the Number Format field and type a period. Move your cursor IN FRONT of the period you just typed, then click the drop-down arrow for Include level number from and select Level 2. Now move your cursor IN FRONT of that number, click the drop-down arrow again for Include level number from and select Level 1. You should end up with Appendix 1.1.1 in the Number format field.
  30. Set the indentations and tab positions (I set the alignment at 0 cm, and the indentation and tab stops at 3.5 cm, following my Appendix H1, H2 and H3 style’s settings). Don’t set any other settings.
  31. Click OK to return to the Define New List Style dialog box.
  32. On the Define New List Style dialog box, check the preview box to make sure all the indenting is correct and aligned as you want it. (When I was setting this up, some of the indenting went out-of-whack.) To fix the indenting for any level, select that level from the Apply formatting to field, then click Format > Numbering and reapply the values to the indentation and tab fields. Repeat for any other levels that are out of alignment. That should sort it out.
  33. Finally, click OK to close the Define New List Style dialog box.

Breathe. The worst is over.

Step 3: Test

  1. Add some text to your document — don’t wory if it’s in your template as you’ll delete it after you’ve done your testing and sorted out the TOC. Add some short paragraphs (just a few words) to represent short headings, and longer text to see how it wraps on to the next line.
  2. Apply Appendix H1 style to the paragraphs you want to be the main Appendix headings, Appendix H2 style to those you want to be sub-levels of the Appendix H1 heading, and Appendix H3 for those you want to be sub-levels of Appendix H1 and H2 headings.
  3. Mix them up a bit and apply different styles to see how the numbering changes accordingly.

Assuming everything is OK, you can now add these styles to your TOC if you want them to show there.

Step 4: Optional: Modify the TOC to display the Appendix heading levels

  1. Go to the References tab > Table of Contents group and click the icon for Table of Contents.
  2. Select Insert Table of Contents.
  3. On the Table of Contents dialog box, click Options.
  4. Type 1 in the empty box next to Appendix H1.
  5. Type 2 in the empty box next to Appendix H2.
  6. Type 3 in the empty box next to Appendix H3.
  7. Click OK twice to exit the Table of Contents dialog.
  8. Click OK when asked if you want to replace the existing Table of Contents.

If you were setting this up in a template, delete the paragraphs you added for testing.

See also:

[Links last checked January 2012]

12 comments

  1. Thank you very much for this tip! I have been wrestling with multilevel appendix headings for technical reports in word for some time and was basically ready to revert to TeX to get some consistency. :)
    This helped a lot.


  2. How do you number Figures and Tables using this method.
    Figure A-1. XXXXX XXXXX XXX


  3. Hi Linda

    I’m not sure you can.

    First, you’d have to use letters instead of numbers for your appendix headings. So where I’ve documented ’1, 2, 3′, you’d select the ‘A, B, C’ option instead (see steps 10, 18 and 27 above). Then you’d select ‘Include Chapter Number’ on the Insert Caption dialog (under the Numbering button).

    However, I’m pretty sure you can’t then select any style for the chapter number other than Heading 1, 2, 3 etc. And if you already have that selected for the main figures/tables, changing it here will change them too. As far as I know (I experimented with this some time back), you can’t run a separate sequence of caption numbers using Word’s standard captioning options. You might be able to do something with SEQ or other fields, but I’m only guessing.

    I suggest you ask this question (or search for an answer) on the Microsoft Word forum:http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/office/forum/word. If you find an answer there, I’d appreciate it if you could share the link/solution here too.

    –Rhonda


  4. Thank you for your excellent efforts. I followed your instructions and now have a functioning report template.
    Unfortunately I added a hyphen to the Appendix Numbering which seemed a good idea at the time;
    Appendix A – Heading Title of Appendix A.
    The result is that when I refer to it in a Cross Reference I get
    … as set out in Appendix A -.
    My immediate question is how to remove the hyphen. My efforts so far have resulted in no hyphen (good) but the next level down going from A.1 to just .1 (bad).
    My fundamental question is what is the best way of modifying a complicated multi-level list without starting from scratch.


  5. Hi John

    It’s easy enough to get rid of the hyphen without redoing the entire process. Put your cursor into any Appendix heading, then click the drop-down list on the ribbon for the multilevel numbering icon (NOT the number icon — the one to the right of it). Select Define New Multilevel List (yes, I know that seems counter-intuitive…). On the Define New Multilevel List window, remove the hyphen from the Enter Formatting for Number field, then click OK.

    As far as the rest of your question goes, you can make modifications using the method I’ve just described — go into the Define New Multilevel List window and make the changes there.

    –Rhonda


  6. Do you know how to make these appear in the Outline mode? That doesn’t seem to work for me.

    Cheers,
    –gordon


  7. Hi Gordon

    Check the paragraph settings of your Appendix styles — if they are set to ‘Body Text’, then you’ll need to change them to Level 1, Level 2 etc. for them to show in the Outline view or the Navigation pane. NOTE: I don’t believe this Level 1, 2 etc. in the paragraph dialog box is the same as the Level 1,2 set in the numbering, but I haven’t done enough testing to confirm.

    –Rhonda


  8. Hi Rhoda….

    I am having a mixure of chapters and Appendixes in my document
    I got a bit mixed up in making the required setup so i was wondering if i could take some valuable advice from you …

    I wanted to do the below setup …
    have a Appendix H (For example)
    the below that have H.1(heading 1 Result)
    below that H.1.1 (heading 2 sub Result)

    Would this setup be possible to make ?
    Thanks in advance ..
    regards
    Saeesh


  9. Hi Saeesh

    I’m travelling at the moment so can’t check Word, but I don’t think you can do that. If you put the letter in manually in the numbering, then the H would apply to ALL Appendices, not just Appendix H.

    Rhonda


  10. Hi guys
    Lots of good tips, but does anyone know if it is possible to start the number at 0, say for an introduction section to a document. If so how is this achieved?
    John


  11. Great instructions. Thanks you!



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